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Notes on Roman 7-16 "Overcome Evil with Good", CFM study for Aug. 12 - 18

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Romans can be long and confusing!  Our family found these two videos from the Bible Project helpful in giving a good overview of the whole picture:





Marriage Analogy, Romans 7:1-6Paul begins this chapter with an explanation of how the law of Moses is done away and fulfilled in Christ.  He compares it to a woman whose husband died so she is free to marry again and not be under the condemnation of adultery if she should do so.  The law of Moses died with Christ and now the saints are free to "serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter."  In this way, the law of Moses was temporary and conditional.   The Law Defines Sin, Romans 7:7-13Lest the people misunderstand and think Paul is saying the law was or is bad, he explains the purpose of the law was to help the people understand what sin is.  The word "concupiscence" in verse 8 is translated as "covetousness" in Wayment.  A dictionary says it is a strong, overpowering desire or lust.  The…

Notes on Romans 1-6 "The Power of God unto Salvation," CFM study for Aug. 5 - 11

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About the Book of Romans And now we're on to the letters portion of the New Testament!  This is an interesting section, which is not organized chronologically, but mostly by length of the letter.  Romans is the longest letter and Paul's writing is very dense.  There's also a lot of terms that are used that have a lot of baggage in that they have come to mean specific things to some denominations and so it is hard for us to parse out the modern meaning that some have assigned words like "faith," "grace," "works," "justification," from the author's original intent.  It's also easy to proof-text, or take one verse in isolation and claim Paul meant something he really didn't.  It's important to put the words in the context of the original Greek and in context of the other things that Paul wrote, both in Romans and in other letters.

Peter himself wrote that Paul isn't easy to understand, "even as our beloved brot…