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Showing posts from June, 2008

Surprise! Our new baby . . .

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Yep, arriving on Tuesday, charming us all, covered in plenty of hair and bottle-feeding like a champ, it's . . .





a RACCOON ?!?!?!?! Yep! He joined our family on Tuesday, when we found him, apparently motherless, in the woods behind our house. We took him in and gave him plenty of love. Thus began a great adventure in the world of raccoon parenting. We named him Bandit and fed him puppy formula from a bottle. He chirped when you scratched his back and had a habit of pooping on us. In doing some internet research, we found that raccoons can make great, though unpredictable, pets. We also found out that raccoons are illegal to keep as pets in Utah. I called a wildlife rehabilitatator in Heber, who offered to meet me that day at Bridal Veil Falls and take the critter off our hands. He said the statute in Utah states that since raccoons are not native to the state, they should be dispatched upon capture. However, he said he did not like to do that, so he took care of them unt…

And now a word about socks . . . and other dirty laundry

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We wash a lot of socks around here. We fold a lot of socks. Socks have the potential to be the bane of our existence. Luckily, I have a method that has worked great in our family. Except for mom and dad, no one owns any! Oh sure, we have a lot of socks and my kids wear them, but they don't OWN them. Nope. We don't wear shoes or socks in our house. Our mud room is set up with slots to hold both shoes and socks (This is an old picture; trust me, our mudroom never looks this clean and the tiny basket of socks on top is not big enough for all of our socks, so we moved them to the bottom bin on the far right in the picture), and after the socks are all folded, they get put away in that bin. When the kids need a pair, they pull out the bin and find a pair that's about the right size. I try to buy lots of socks in the same size and color so its easy to find matches when we're folding. We keep a big basket of lonely socks in the laundry room and it grows from week t…

A Week in Review . . .

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For almost 4 years now, I've been in the habit of sending out weekly emails to my kids' grandparents and a few friends and family. I don't usually post what I say there here, but now that I'm blogging more, I thought, hey, why not? So, here, for your reading enjoyment, is some of my email from yesterday:




Friday morning, we had a huge load of cabinets delivered to our house. DH spent a huge amount of time before our house was finished preparing cherry cabinets for his office and our entertainment area. He’d done about 70% of the work, but then the demands of installing and finishing all the other cabinets for our house took priority. With his new job and ongoing family responsibilities, he hadn’t had time to finish them and they sat in his friend’s commercial shop until this week. A month ago, this friend called and said they had some time free (a common occurrence around here in the construction industry lately) and wondered if he could finish the job for us. Wha…

"When we're done"

One of the sweetest things about having almost-4-year-old twins is listening to their prayers. No matter how crabby or defiant they have been during the day, no matter how much they fought two minutes earlier over whose turn it is to go first, the sincerity of their prayers is humbling. It's also a bit amusing sometimes, as they go on and on, "And thank yous for our pretty light, and ours lovely house and ours lovely bed, and thank yous that we get to wake up in the morning and have breakfast and thank you that we can play with roly-polys..."

Last week, just before prayers we sang "I Am a Child of God," both girls' favorite song (you can listen to it here, if you like, with some bonus ASL). With the message of the song in her heart, Sarah's prayer included the phrase, "And thank you we get to live with you again when we're done."

Something about the way she said that phrase humbled me. I really like the idea that we will return to God…

One of the best parts about having DH work from home...

Since January, DH has been working from home about half the time. I don't always know when he'll be here and mostly I try to pretend he isn't here while I go about my normal day (that's so he can get some work done).

But one thing I love is that I can leave while Eliza sleeps. This morning, I took Michael and the twins to a summer movie ("The Bee Movie," which was totally stupid, by the way) and left Eliza in her crib. DH listened for her, but she didn't wake up until after we got back.

I haven't been blogging, but I've been reading . .

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Here's a review of one book I loved:

The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio: How My Mother Raised 10 Kids on 25 Words or Less by Terry Ryan


My review
rating: 5 of 5 stars
I don't often give books 5 stars, but this one deserved it. An uplifting look at a way a mother in the 50s and 60s took what could have been a devastating situation and turned it into the best. The stories and anecdotes in the book made me smile and sometimes laugh out loud -- the story of when terry (aka Tuff) babysits her siblings, the tulip fiasco, the amazing ways they find to make their household appliances work even when they don't (applying pressure to the fridge at just the right spot to pop open the seal when the handles broke).



The mother's husband is a sometimes-abusive alcoholic, and yet while not glossed over in the book, he really is a peripheral character -- the spotlight is on the tenacity and creativity of the author's mother, the Prize Winner. In a contest-centered world, she uses he…