Friday, April 27, 2012

The Tongue of Angels (Friday Favorites)

After I posted about talking to myself last week, I listened to this talk (thanks for the recommendation, Cheryl!).

Wow, was it a powerful reminder of the power of words for good and ill -- both those we speak to others and those we say to ourselves.

The Tongue of Angels by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland
(click on the "watch" or "listen" links on the right side to hear the talk instead of read it)

some of my favorite parts:

God said, ‘Let there be light: and there was light.’ Joshua spake, and the great lights which God had created stood still. Elijah commanded, and the heavens were stayed for the space of three years and six months, so that it did not rain. … All this was done by faith. … Faith, then, works by words; and with [words] its mightiest works have been, and will be, performed. 1 Like all gifts “which cometh from above,” words are “sacred, and must be spoken with care, and by constraint of the Spirit.” 2

It is with this realization of the power and sanctity of words that I wish to caution us, if caution is needed, regarding how we speak to each other and how we speak of ourselves.

There is a line from the Apocrypha which puts the seriousness of this issue better than I can. It reads, “The stroke of the whip maketh marks in the flesh: but the stroke of the tongue breaketh the bones.” 3 With that stinging image in mind, I was particularly impressed to read in the book of James that there was a way I could be “a perfect man.”

Said James: “For in many things we offend all. [But] if any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man, and able also to bridle the whole body.”

&

May I expand this counsel to make it a full family matter. We must be so careful in speaking to a child. What we say or don’t say, how we say it and when is so very, very important in shaping a child’s view of himself or herself. But it is even more important in shaping that child’s faith in us and their faith in God. Be constructive in your comments to a child—always. Never tell them, even in whimsy, that they are fat or dumb or lazy or homely. You would never do that maliciously, but they remember and may struggle for years trying to forget—and to forgive. And try not to compare your children, even if you think you are skillful at it. You may say most positively that “Susan is pretty and Sandra is bright,” but all Susan will remember is that she isn’t bright and Sandra that she isn’t pretty. Praise each child individually for what that child is, and help him or her escape our culture’s obsession with comparing, competing, and never feeling we are “enough.”
&

In all of this, I suppose it goes without saying that negative speaking so often flows from negative thinking, including negative thinking about ourselves. We see our own faults, we speak—or at least think—critically of ourselves, and before long that is how we see everyone and everything.

4 comments:

bjahlstrom said...

Wow. That is powerful.

Cheryl said...

You're welcome!!

Diane said...

I just listened to this 3 times in a row yesterday as a good reminder. I sure need it right now.

swedemom said...

Another friend of mine just wrote a blog post about words in the family and what words we use when we speak with another. Guess the Spirit is trying to tell me something! Thanks for the reminder.

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